Onahole Review

a blog on Japanese sextoys and sexuality

Hiragana and Katakana

| 6 Comments

Earlier today I had some fun on Twitter with @ToysHeartShop trying to figure out how to translate “sujiman kupa” in English 🙂 I still rely on Google Translate to transcript my romanji into hiragana, I guess it’s “more than nothing”. For days now I try to remember and correctly write “a”, “i” and “u” in hiragana, still a long way to go until I can read what’s on the onahole package (could be interesting). Learning kanji ? LOL no, I better rely on writing hiragana on keyboard and then just pressing the spacebar, computer transcripts this into kanji all alone 😀

Well I don’t have a Japanese keyboard yet, so I made hiragana and katakana charts, in two fonts.

hira1hira2

kata1kata2

hirakata

(click for full size)

Have fun 🙂

AkaiHebi

Author: AkaiHebi

European otaku exploring Japan's most amazing anime sex toys for fun, since 2011. Feminist and sex-positivist. Pansexual. Genderbender. Freedoms activist. オナホ レビュー 著者 「onaho-review-author」

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6 Comments
  1. I’m studying Japanese at University, so maybe I’ll give you some tips now and then. Just try to learn 10-20 Hiragana a day, then practice reading and writing them. In the mean time, if you’d like, I can translate hiragana and katakana for any of your reviews. I don’t know kanji, yet, though.

    Anyway, I love your site. I visit often. Your onahole site is the best, and as far as I know, the only English one. I did prefer your old rating system, but the new one is also more in-depth.

    So even though I’ve been following your site for a while, I still haven’t bought any onaholes, and that’s starting to bug me (because guess what? I;m a lonely nerd. Go figure). I don’t want to spend heaps on once, but I’d like my first to be really great. NLS just has WAY too many to choose from, however, and obviously, you haven’t reviewed EVERYTHING. I’m thinking maybe the Age series would be a good place to start. Any suggestions?

    • AkaiHebi

      10-20 a day ?! Oh my. Feel free to post what you can read from the package, but yes there’s often a kanji here and there to gloriously prevent you from getting the meaning of the sentence 😀 But I see some new stuff with english translation, stuff they plan to export overseas too (G Project stuff).

      Hey it’s just a personal blog, nothing professional, nothing commercial 🙂 But yes it has a +75% progression for 4 straight weeks, with a good 30% returning visitors, I guess I started something useful that hasn’t been done before (but I don’t mind “competitors”, nobody non-professional can review everything).

      So, recommendations for the first onahole… always feeling some kind of pressure, “what if people don’t feel it like I do” but whatever 🙂 Going directly to Seventeen Bordeaux maybe, and Ju-C for something less lifelike. Adding a “open my pussy” and a Tenga egg, Finish & Clean lotion and you got your first order for weeks/months of various fun 🙂

      Considering the Age series, I think Eleven and Fifteen are somewhat outdated and not worth the price, Seven stands out with a low price and Twenty with amazing structure. Seventeen is a no, Seventeen Evo not really a “must have”.

      PS: I’m considering rewriting the rating system, featuring the powerful “rich snippets” 🙂

      • Hey, thanks for your reply! Yeah, at Uni, it’s quite fast-paced, but we go over them for the whole week (well, four days, really). It sounds like a lot, and it can be a bit to take in at first, but practicing stroke order is very important. I know J-List has the Genki books that we use at Uni, which are a little price, but definitely helpful. If you just want to learn the hiragana and katakana, the Genkei 1 workbook has a whole section where you practice your kana next to each one (and directions for stroke order), or the Genki 1 textbook which has an entire kana chart on the inside cover (hiragana at the front, katakana at the back). Once you get it, it’s quite easy, but it does take some time. It’s just practice, memorisation, and being able to recall them from memory. Really, it’s one big memory game.

        If there’s anything specific you want translated, feel free to ask. There is one helpful app on iOS (dunno about Android) that’s great for looking up Kanji and the definition, although if you don’t know kana, it can be a little tricky to find the Kanji you’re looking at, if you’re starting from scratch. The app is called imiwa?

        You know, whether or not your blog is professional definitely doesn’t matter to me (and personally, I prefer them to be personal blogs, because they’re more….. personal. Okay, well, let’s just say they’re more honest). I mean, I guess the alternative is always NLS’ reviews….. if you can actually understand what they mean. Which I usually can’t.

        I think I’ve decided what I’ll pick up, and I’ll let you know what once I get them, but for now, it’s a secret. Haha.

        Your new review system that you posted about sounds quite good, and I’ll eventually get around to checking it on my iPhone so I can let you know how it works (I presume you have an Android phone, considering your test results).

  2. Oh, I just thought of the most obvious tip that I should have mentioned earlier:

    You don’t need to learn all the hiragana straight away. That is, there are a lot of extra ones with ten-ten (literally means dot-dot) next to them, such as “ka” (か) that becomes “ga” (が) by adding ten-ten. So don’t bother with any of those, because as long as you learn the first one, you can just add ten-ten (or in the case of “p”, the maru – the little circle) later on, and it’ll change the sound of the kana. It makes it easier for memorisation if you’re not trying to remember all those extra ones.

    Also, try to learn hiragana completely before moving onto katakana. It makes it easier. Yeah, I know, katakana is more useful for these kind of things, but trust me, learning hiragana first will make it easier for you in the long run.

  3. I studied a bit of Japanese way back in University. I kind of forgot much of it over the years and have been trying to get back into it by translating doujinshi but those damn Kanji keep getting to me!

  4. Thank you for sharing this post. I started learning Japanese recently and was really struggling to memorize both Hiragana and Katakana. Then after making an educational mug (with multiplying tables) for my friend’s son, I came across an idea to make one for myself. So I just printed Hiragana and Katakana charts on my coffee mugs, so I can study them every time when I have my coffee. It worked well for me, so I even decided to put them on my online store.
    Hiragana mug

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